How to Create a Meta Description

Meta tags are an excellent search engine optimization tool that far too many people seem to have forgotten about. While keywords and backlinks keep people busy, the meta description has been left on the sidelines. This is unfortunate, and it can be the difference between someone clicking on your link in their search engine results or just scrolling on by.

How to Create a Meta Description

How to Create a Meta Description

There are right and wrong ways to write a meta description—and you, of course, want to do it the right way. To help, we have a simple guide for creating a meta description.

What is a Meta Description?

While you might be unfamiliar with the term, you are familiar with meta descriptions. When you search for something in a search engine, results are returned, and underneath the link will be a sentence or two describing what you will find should you click on the link. If the description is good, you will likely click. If it isn’t, you won’t. Which is why they are so important.

Start with Action Verbs

This is a basic marketing technique, often used in call to actions. And that is basically what a meta description is. Encourage your readers to click so they can learn, grab, win, get, or discover something.

Be Specific

What is it that they can learn, grab, win, get, or discover? They need to know before they will click. Readers are savvy, and anything that comes off as deceptive or overtly click-baity will turn off readers rather than bring them in.

Solve a Problem or Provide a Benefit

This is part of the item above, but it gets at the heart of what the readers are looking for. Quality content should do one or the other: solve a problem or provide a benefit. And this should be made clear in your meta description.

Stick to 155 Characters or Less

Why 155 characters? Because Google will cut off your description in the middle or sentence, or even a word, if it runs too long. And chances are slim the reader will click to figure out what they were missing there.

Keywords Are Not Needed

Sophisticated algorithms now punish rather than reward keyword stuffing. If it feels natural, you can include one keyword, but do not force it. Focus more on quality and length, not keywords.

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